Helping Men Through Life Transitions

Are you standing on the sidelines of your life?

Are you a guy who feels at a loss as to how to balance your professional and personal life?

Do you feel really uncomfortable when the conversation turns “emotional?”

Does it seem impossible to be a good partner, parent, employee and still get what you want?

Are you starting to cope with stress by drinking too much, smoking pot, or escaping into porn?

Does it feel like a betrayal to talk to friends, family, or colleagues about relationship problems?

Are you starting to wonder what gives your life meaning?

 

You feel like you’ve got to be good at everything, but you’re not getting there on most things. You want to be a good partner and parent, but the feedback you’re getting sure doesn’t feel like you’re getting close to the mark often enough. You’re walking away from the tough conversations feeling like you didn’t know exactly what to say or, if you did, it didn’t come out the way you were hoping it would. You realize you’re starting to avoid things, but you’re not sure how to get things on track.

You worry that it’s a sign of weakness to seek out help to work through your problems. It’s tough enough to admit you’re struggling let alone ask for help. You should be able to do it all on your own, right? You do not want to just go to some office to talk about your feelings and listen to a bunch of psychobabble. How is that helpful when you only have so much time to get things done? Maybe you feel like it’s a betrayal to talk about people in your life who you are struggling with, or you fear exposing your shortcomings to someone you don’t know who may judge you.

It’s common for men to avoid expressing our feelings and see weakness in seeking help. Our culture teaches and reinforces this in us from the day we’re born. Unfortunately, this perpetuates a lot of unnecessary suffering and isolation for us and the people in our lives.

 

Common Concerns About Therapy

  • I’ll be judged for seeking help for something I should be able to deal with on my own. The downside of the male stereotype that our culture promotes leads many men to suffer alone when they could collaborate, connect and move their lives forward.  Confronting our challenges head on is a sign of strength, not weakness.
  • I’m already juggling a lot. How can I make time for therapy too? Your schedule is so full with work projects, home projects, relationship, and kids with no time left over for yourself. It’s time to put yourself into your schedule. Most clients realize that taking time for themselves in therapy makes them far more present and productive in their lives and fulfilled in their relationships. It requires making a commitment, a commitment to yourself. I have two office locations, and I offer both online and weekend sessions to help you find time for yourself in your schedule. 
  • How is talking going to help? Isolation, hyper self-reliance and avoidance are some of the biggest challenges and causes of anxiety and depression for the guys in my practice.  Meeting with a therapist helps with all of these. Getting things off your chest, getting support from someone who understands what you’re going through and addressing your challenges head on brings relief and a feeling of empowerment for most clients. Clients often feel that collaborating with me helps them gain a deeper understanding of themselves, the problems they face and, as a result, opens new avenues for them to move forward.

You’ve been spinning your wheels for long enough. It’s time to get traction and move forward.